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Wellesley College News 



VOL. XXX. 



WELLESLEY, MASS., MARCH 2, 1922 



No. 19 



HOUSE DISCUSSES 

CHAPEL ATTENDANCE 



Sport Costumes Also Considered 

"The constant decrease in chapel at- 
tendance has become a matter of seri- 
ous concern," said M dred MuYfl, 
Speaker of the House of Representa- 
tives, at a meeting of the House held 
in Founders' Hall on Thursday after- 
noon, February 23. The question of 
compulsory chapel attendance has 
therefore offered itself as a possible 
alternative to the present voluntary 
service. The advisability of such a 
change was the chief subject of dis- 
cussion at the meeting. Several 
other matters, including the wearing 
of knickers on the campus, the com- 
mittee bureau plan, and the possibility 
of returning from vacations only in 
time for one's first class, were also 
brought up by the speaker. 

Question of Chapel a Serious One 

The slight attendance at morning 
chapel has caused many of the officers 
of the college to wonder whether the 
service means so little to the life of 
the college that it should be abolished 
altogether. The House felt strongly 
that chapel should not be abolished, 
but discussed a system of compulsory 
chapel in use in other universities and 
colleges. In favor of compulsory 
chapel, speakers urged the need of 
Wellesley, as a college, to come to- 

(Continued on Page 5, Col. 1) 



FELLOWSHIPS OFFERED IN 

ECONOMIC RESEARCH 



Training Given to Graduates 

Three paid fellowships in social-eco- 
nomic research are offered each year 
by the Women's Educational and In- 
dustrial Union to women who wish 
thorough preparation for such work. 
The fellowships carry a stipend of 
$500. Clerical assistance, equipment, 
and traveling expenses necessary for 
the investigation are furnished by the 
Department of Research. 

Classification of Candidate 

A degree from a college of good 
standing, training in economics or so- 
ciology, and satisfactory references in 
regard to health, character and spe- 
cial fitness for social-economic re- 
search are required for all candidates 
for the fellowship. For the past five 
years the successful applicants have 
been women with some graduate train- 
ing or experience. The research fel- 
lows are expected to devote their entire 
time for ten months to the training 
given by the Department of Research. 

Training Offered 

Training is given in the making and 
criticism of schedules, in field work, 

(Continued on Page 9, Col. 3.) 



WELLESLEY NIGHT PROMISES 
TO BE SUCCESS FOR FUND 



Mr. Arliss Will Speak 

Plans for the Wellesley ,Night Per- 
formance of The Green Goddess at the 
Plymouth Theatre ou March 13 are 
rapidly being completed, under the di- 
rection of the Boston Wellesley Club. 
The committee in charge is composed 
of Mrs. Alice Morton Claflin, '10, who 
was active in making Wellesley Night 
last year a success; Mrs. Swett, in 
charge of the candy which is to be 
sold for Wellesley; Mrs. Helen Strain 
Russell, '20, and Miss Florence Kel- 
logg, '20. Ushers and candy sellers 
have already been appointed, with 
Olive Ladd, '22, in charge. 

Sale of Tickets 

The Plymouth Theatre is helping to 
make the performance a financial suc- 
cess for the Fund. The entire house 
has been sold to the Boston Wellesley 
Club, who are selling the tickets at 
holiday rates, with a few at a lower 
price. The most expensive seats in 
the house will be $3.50. 

Mr. Arliss Will Speak 

As an added attraction, Mr. Arliss, 
«'ho stars fa the production, has con- 
sented to make a special speech to 
the Wellesley audience. Before the 
play and between the acts, Wellesley 
songs will be sung, with Hildegarde 
Churchill, '22, as leader. 



SPEAKERS PRESENT NEGRO 

EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS 



Hampton Quartette Sings Negro 
Songs 

The President of Hampton Institute, 
Dr. Gregg, a Virginia lawyer, Mr. 
Walker, and four graduates of 
the school in the famous Hampton 
quartet, made the 4:40 hour on Friday, 
February 24, one that a capacity Bill- 
ings Hall audience would fain have 
prolonged indefinitely. 

The first speaker, Mr. Walker, was 
introduced by President Pendleton. In 
vivid style, he outlined his early life 
and told how, born of slave parents, 
he had worked to earn enough money 
to get to Hampton; then how he had 
earned enough to stay there. 

"You don't know what ignorance is," 
said Mr. Walker earnestly. "There was 
a time in my life, however, when I 
had more of that commodity than I 
knew what to do with." 

Work at Hampton Described 

The speaker then described the 
training he had had at Hampton, and 
how, upon graduating, he had gone 
back to his home and raised the nego 
living conditions, by means of more 
schools, temperance movements, and 
consequent lowering of criminal and 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 3.) 



SEES BARN AT PRESENT AS 

EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE 



Professor Baker Gives Views on 
College Dramatics 



"The one thing you can never take 
,'- chance on in the theatre business is 
boring your audience," said Professor 
George P. Baker, of Harvard Univer- 
sity, when interviewed, on the occa- 
sion of his last visit here, as to the 
sort of play desirable for college pro- 
duction. In initiating the present sys- 
tem of all-college dramatics, the 
Drama Committee has had some diffi- 
culty over the choice of plays which 
will be at once popular with the col- 
lege, and yet conform to a certain 
standard of excellence. 

Function of Wellesley Dramatics 

It is always necessary to consider 
the peculiar circumstances of specific 
cases. Wellesley is situated sufficiently 
near to enable the students to see mus- 
ical comedy at will. For this reason, 
Professor Baker thought that the col- 
lege dramatics should fill (and, if nec- 
essary, create) a need for other forms 

(Continued on Page 2, Col. 2.) 



ARCHITECT TO LECTURE 



Mr. C. Z. Klauder Will Speak On 
Design In Architecture 



The Department of Art announces a 
lecture to be given by Mr. Charles Z. 
Klauder on Thursday, March 9, at 
7:45 P. M. in the Art Building. Mr. 
Klauder is of the firm of Day and 
Klauder, Architects, of Philadelphia, 
who designed Founders' Hall. His 
subject will be "Some Aspects of De- 
sign in Architecture." Mr. Klauder 
has been asked by the American As- 
sociation of Architects to speak at col- 
leges throughout the country on sub- 
jects relating to the appreciation of 
art and architecture. 



WORK OF 56 PRINT MAKERS 

SHOWN AT MUSEUM 



Exhibit Will Close March 18 



An exhibition of the work of the 
Print Makers Society of California 
will be held in the gallery of the 
Farnsworth Museum from February 
21 to March 18. This exhibition in- 
cludes block prints, lithographs and 
etchings and represents the work of 
fifty-six artists. These artists are 
scattered over England, France, Italy, 
Australia, the United States and Can- 
ada, many of them being members or 
associates of the Royal Society of 
Etchers of London. 



PROGRAM ANNOUNCED FOR 

RACHMANINOFF CONCERT 



Pianist and Composer Will Give 
First Recital in Series 



. Chopin 



Sergei Rachmaninoff, world-famous 
pianist and v omposer, will play the 
following selections at his recital in 
the Houghton Memorial Chapel on 
Monday, March 6, at 8:00 P. M.: 

1. Ballade No. 2 Liszt 

2. Ballade, Opus 24 Grieg 

3. Ballade No. 3 
Nocturne, Opus 27 
Valse in D flat major 
Scherzo, Opus 39 

4. Prelude in C sharp ") 

minor I Rachmaninoff 

Polka de W. R. 

5. Etude (Capriccio) Opus 28 

Dohnanyi 

6. Liebesleid . . Kreisler-Rachmaninoff 

7. Tarantella (Venezia e Napoli), Liszt 

(Steinway Piano Used) 
The Department of Music announces 
that no more reserved seats are avail- 
able. It is also ruled that no single 
tickets will be sold for this concert 
alone, but only those which include 
the entire course. The reason is that 
the college is unable to finance con- 
certs of such note as the.se unless the 
whole amount of the expense is 
pledged beforehand. 



NEW SCHOLARSHIP IDEALS 

DISCUSSED BY DEANS 



College Girls Less Collegiate, 
Conference Hears 



"I believe there is a renewed ideal 
in the average college student today," 
said Mrs. Pearl Randall Salmon, dean 
of women at the University of Ver- 
mont, at the conference of the deans 
of womens' colleges held in Chicago 
last week. The Christian Science 
Monitor, in quoting her speech fur- 
ther, continues, "Am I incorrect in 
thinking that I sense the beginning of 
a reaction against an over-emphasis 
of college life and an under-emphasis 
of college attainment? There seems 
to be an increasing feeling that the 
colleges exist only for those who are 
worth college training, and that the 
average student, as well as the honor 
student, must find his ultimate goal 
and develop his possible power." 

Mrs. Salmon, in her championship 
of the cause of the average student, 
said that when he had "gained some 
understanding of his own limits and 
possibilities, has sensed even dimly the 
scope and power of wisdom and 
beauty through t!he ages/' then he 
would be ready to put into circulation 
the truths unearthed by the research 
of the scholar. 

Dean Waite, Dean Tufts, and Miss 
Orvis attended the conference. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



HAVE YOU SEEN OUR ATTRACTIVE 



ii 



WAISTS 
SUITS 



SWEATERS 
DRESSES 



PECK BROOKS CO., Inc. 



E-l 



WABAN ANNEX 



LIST OF APPROVED HOUSES 
POSTED 



Wellesley Inn 



STEAKS, FRIED CHICKEN 
and WAFFLES 

for those who enjoy good food and pleasant 
surrounding's. 

Telephone 180. Reserve the Chimney Cor- 
ner for your Dinner Party. 



DR. L. B. ALLYN 

of the Westfield Laboratories gives 



s 



AN-HYJA 

Ginger Ale 



a high place among carbonated beverages. 
We say, it's delectable. 

Buy it at Wellesley stores and tea- 
rooms and we'll "Do it well for Wellesley" 

HYGEIA BEVERAGES, Inc. 



NATICK 



MASS. 



P. S. — You'll find our bottled orangeade 
(Hello) equal to fresh orange juice. It's 
the drink for after exercise. 



Venu^ 



THIN 

lead: 




For 



^VENUS EVERPOINTED 

and other Metal Pencils 



■•HE name VENUS is your 

J. guarantee of perfection. 

Absolutely crumble- proof, 

smooth and perfectly graded. 

7 DEGREES 

2B soft Si black H med. hard 
B soft 2H hard 

F firm 4H extra hard 

HB medium— for general use 

15c per tube of 12 leads; 

$1.50 per dozen tubes 

If yourdealer cannot supply you writeus. 

American Lead Pencil Co. 

215 Fifth Ave., Dept. , New York 
Ask us about the new 
VENUS EVERPOINTED PENCILS 



SEES BARN AT PRESENT AS 
EXPERIMENTAL THEATRE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



of the drama. While trying the ex- 
periment of all-college dramatics, 
there is an excellent opportunity for 
the Barn to be experimental in its 
choice of plays. 

Enthusiasm and Patience Needed 

In speaking of the experimental 
theatre, Professor Baker brought up 
many of the problems confronting the 
Barn at present. He mentioned the 
inevitable hostility of audiences, who 
take the aggressive attitude of de- 
manding to be amused, rather than 
seeking to understand. This spirit of 
apposition he believes can be overcome 
by community cooperation in pushing 
the plays, and by a generous exercise 
of the enthusiasm and patience which 
triumphantly do away with obstacles 
to production. Professor Baker felt 
that the system of centralized dra- 
matics was the only feasible one; and 
he was full of encouragement as to the 
amount that could be accomplished 
with the most meager equipment. 



DR. C. E. TAYLOR 
DR. D. R. CLEMENT 

DENTISTS 

WABAN BLOCK, WELLESLEY 
TEL. I3S-J 



A HOMELIKE HOTEL 

Attractive Living Room 

Refined Atmosphere 

Tea Room and Dining Room 

Good Food 

at 

The Waban Hotel 

WELLESLEY SQUARE 






The Green Bough Tea House 

Specialty Shop 



597 Washington Street, 



Wellesley, Mass. 



+- 



Afternoon Tea 
2 to 5 P. M. 



MISS C. E. SELFE 



Sunday Dinner 
1 to 2 



Dinner 
6 to 7 P.M. 



MISS C. ROUSSEL 



SOCIETIES HOLD PROGRAM 
MEETINGS 



The Administration has recently 
made public the following list of ap- 
proved houses at the shore and in the 
country, where students may stay 
without chaperones: 

BALD PATE, MASS. 

"Bald Pate Inn"— Mr. Wm. Bray, $4 

to $6 per day. Opens April 1st. 

JAFFREY, N. H. 

"Shattuck's Inn"— Mrs. Mayo, $4 to $8 

per day. 
"The Ark" — Mrs. Poole. 
MANCHESTER-BY-THE SEA, MASS. 
"Sign of the Crane" — Mrs. Lincoln 
Patterson. 

MARBLEHEAD, MASS. 
New Glover Inn — Mr. I. F. Anderson. 
43 Gregory Street — Miss E. V.j Brower, 

$19 per week. 
134 Front Street — Miss F. H. Johnson. 
Room and board, $3 per day. Board, 
$2. 
132 Front Street— Mrs. Boles. 
137 Front Street — Mrs. H. Sumner 
Torrey, $1 to $3 per day. (Rooms 
only.) 
10 Goodwin's Court — Mrs. Nellie M. 
Brown, $1.50 to $2 per day. (Rooms 
only.) 
Robie Mansion — Miss Jordan, $1.25 
per day. (Rooms only.) 
NAHANT, MASS. 
"Whitney Homestead" — Mr. B. C. 
Whitney, $3 per day. 

NORTHFIELD, Mass. 
"The Northfield"— Mr. Everett Martin, 
$4 to $7 per day; $21 to $36 per 
week. 

PHILLIPS BEACH, MASS. 
"Deer Cove Inn" — Mrs. Harriet Spof- 
fard, $5 per day_. 

PIGEON COVE, MASS. 
"Glen Acre" — Mrs. Abbie Williams, 
$3 per day; Mrs. M. A. Swett, $19.50 
per week. 

PROVINCETOWN, MASS. 
4 Nickerson Street — Mrs. Luther 
Hatch, $12 per week. 

SCITUATE, MASS. 
"Colonial Inn" — Mrs. Doherty, $4 per 
day. 
(Continued on Page 9, Col. 4.) 



Character of Their Work Shown 



All the societies held program meet- 
ings on Saturday evening, February 
25. The individual programs follow: 
Agora 
The consideration of the importance 
of city government was the subject. 
The program was divided into two 
parts: 

I 

A paper outlining the city government 

of New York. Alice Chapman, '23. 

A discussion of the recent campaign 

for Mayor. 
Histories of the Tammany and Anti- 
Tammany campaigns. Shirley 
Smith, '22, and Carolyn Ladd, '23. 
Electioneering speeches of the candi- 
dates Curran and Hylan. Elizabeth 
McAloney, '22. 

II 
In the second part the meeting took 
the form of a Board of Aldermen, pre- 
sided over by President Hurlbert 
(Gertrude Scholtz, '23.) Citizens 
came before the board to give reports 
on: 

1. The Meyer Investigation. Pauline 
Coburn, '22. 

2. Mr. Swann's Zoning. Emily Gor- 
don, '22. 

3. A discussion of plans of 

a. The City Commission. 

b. The City Manager. 

Mabel Noyes, '23; Jennette Gruener, 
'23; Frances Smith, '23. 

Alpha Kappa Chi 
The Trial of Euripides 
By 
Aristophanes 

Mnesilochus Erma Bell, '23 

Euripides Dorothy Stone, 

Servant of Agathon , 

Janet McDougall, 

Agathon Kate Ludlum, 



VISIT THE HAT SHOP 

Room 21 " THE WABAN " 

up one flight 

SPECIAL HATS 

Tams, Sport Hats and Dress Hats 

at Moderate Prices 



*22 

'23 

'23 



Female Herald Winetta David, '22 

Clisthenes Marion White, '22 

Prytanis Ruby Phillips, '22 

Policeman Dorothy Weil, '22 

Dancing Girl Stella Balderston, '23 

(Continued on Page 7. Col. 1) 



Have Your Girdles 
Brassieres and Corsets 

carefully fitted by 
an expert at 

Madame Whitney's 

Up one flight The Waban Bldg. 

Also 

Fine Hosiery, Silk Underwear 

Gift Novelties 



Baggage Transferred To and From Station 

Orders Promptly Attended To 

Telephone 16 

DIEHL'S GARAGE & TAXI SERVICE 

R. DIEHL, Proprietor 

37 CENTRAL STREET, - WELLESLEY, MASS. 

Limousines and Touring Cars To Let By Hour, Day or Trip 
Meet All Trains 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



TREASrUEK REPORTS 
SERVICE FUND 



ON 



Receipts and Expenditures Listed 



The Wellesley College Service Fund 
Committee has thus far contributed 
for Wellesley to the following: 

1. a. Foreign educational work 

in Constantinople and Ma- 
drid $1,000 

b. Salaries for Dr. Ruth 
Hume, K. Williams and Dr. 
Bissell 1,500 

c. Our sister college, Yen 
Ching 1,500 

2. Home mission work, s ich as 
schools for negroes, moun- 
tain whites and Indians 492 

3. Relief work, such as the 
Russian famine, Student 
Friendship Fund, and Armen- 
ian and Indian relief 3,813 

The committee has thus al- 
ready expended $8,305 

The total amount received since 
September, including paid pledges, 
Sunday collections, and additional con- 
tributions to special funds is $9,341.62. 

After the spring appropriations have 
been made by the Committee it may 
be that the total expenditures for the 
year will result in a different pro- 
portioning of the amounts from that 
recorded above. 

HELEN S. FRENCH, 
Treasurer of the Wellesley College 
Service Fund. 



EXCLUSIVELY 

IVY CORSETS 

and 

IVY BANDEAUX 

At All Prices 

College Girl 
Models 

and 

RUBBER 

GIRDLES 

a Specialty 
8 GROVE STREET, WELLESLEY 




COLLEGE NOTES 



Miss Edith S. Tufts, Dean of Resi- 
dence, was the guest of honor at a 
luncheon of the Lynn Wellesley Club, 
held at the Deer Cove Inn, Saturday, 
February 18. Dean Tufts spoke in- 
formally on present-day activities in 
the college. 

The first of a series of public lec- 
tures at the Park Museum was given 
by Dr. Margaret C. Ferguson, Pro- 
fessor of Botany, who spoke on "Her- 
edity." 

Miss Sarah Wambaugh, instructor 
last semester in the Department of 
History, spoke recently at a meeting 
of the Daughters of Massachusetts at 
the Hotel Brunswick. Her subject 
was "Six Months in Geneva with the 
Secretariat of the League of Nations." 

Gertrude Nye, '24, has left college 
and plans to go abroad in April. 

A tea was given for Miss Snow, 
head of Washington House, in Agora 
last Friday afternoon. All girls who 
had lived in Washington House were 
invited. 

Charlotte Homer, '21, visited Welles- 
ley last week. 

Miss Streibert, of the Bible Depart- 
ment, has resumed her classes, having 
been ill for some time. 

Marion Parker, '24, has left college 
because of ill health. 

The Scribblers' Club held a meeting 
on February 16. 

The Student Volunteers will give a 
party for the foreign students on Sat- 
urday, March 4. 

The Wellesley Cosmopolitan Club 
attended a joint meeting of the Cos- 
mopolitan Clubs of Harvard, Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology, and 
Boston University, at the Twentieth 
Century Club of Boston, on Sunday 
evening, February 26. Each group 
contributed to the evening's program. 

A meeting of the Mathematics Club 
was held Friday evening, February 24, 
in the Treasure Room of the Library, 
to see the collection of rare books 
there. These included old and valu- 
able copies of arithmetics and al- 
gebras. 

Mrs. Hunt, of the Reading and 
Speaking Department, spoke informal- 
ly to the Campus Discussion Group at 
its meeting Sunday evening, February 
26, at Zeta Alpha. Her subject was 
the relation of art to Christianity. 



MME. ROULET-PAVEY READS 

FROM "PETIT PIERRE" 



Alliance Francaise Hears Well Known 
Lecturer 



Readings from Petit Pierre, the 
novel by Anatole France, were given 
by Mme. Roulet-Pavey, member of the 
Societe de Lecture et de Recitation of 
Paris, at a meeting of the Alliance 
Francaise in Tower Court, Monday 
evening, February 20. 

The well-known French lecturer 
prefaced her reading by a short talk 
on Anatole France and his literary 
achievements. The selections she read 
were entertaining and well inter- 
preted. The success of her delivery 
was partly due to her own charming 
personality. 

A reception in Tower Court preced- 
ed the reading and afforded an oppor- 
tunity for members of the Alliance 
Francaise to meet Mme. Roulet-Pavey 
and to talk with her informally. In 
the receiving line were President 
Pendleton, Mme. Roulet-Pavey, Dean 
Tufts, Miss Dennis and Miss Damazy 
of the French Department, the presi- 
dent and vice-president of the Alliance. 
The Alliance is indebted to Mrs. Ralph 
Wheeler, of Boston, for the privilege 
of hearing Mme. Roulet-Pavey. 



CHURCH TO HOLD BAZAAR 



Autographed Books and Photographs 
Special Attractions 



Wellesley students will find many 
attractive novelties on sale at the 
Spring Bazaar to be held March 10, 
by the Wellesley Congregational 
Church for the benefit of their build- 
ing fund. 

An "Authors' Table" will offer for 
sale autographed books by such 
Wellesley writers as Katherine Lee 
Bates and Margaret Sherwood, and 
by Henry Van Dyke, John Masefield, 
Rudyard Kipling, Hugh Black and 
other well-known authors. Auto- 
graphed photographs of President 
Pendleton, Dean Tufts, Mr. Mac- 
dougall, and of such prominent men 
as President Harding and Mr. Hughes, 
will also be featured. 

Afternoon tea will be served at the 
church from 3:30 to 6:00 P. M., and 
salads, homemade cake and waffles 
are offered as special attractions. 
Fudge and all kinds of novelties will 
be on sale. 



Miss Ruth Hodgkins 

Hairdressing Parlors 

Over Wellesley Bank 
Telephone Wellesley 160 



SPECIAL PRICES AND SPECIAL 
ATTENTION 

given to all work brought by students 
and faculty of Wellesley College. 
Therefore, we ask your patronage. 

B, L, KARTT, Tailor and Cleanser 

Wellesley Square, Opposite Postoffice 



Eyes Examined 

Lenses Ground and all 
kinds of OPTICAL 
REPAIRING done. 

A. B. HAYDEN, 

Jeweler and Optometrist 

Wellesley Square 

DR. STANLEY E. HALL 

DENTIST 

The WABAN Wellesley, Mass. 

Telephone 566-W 



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10 Main St. 



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«• 




THE VALLEY RANCH CO. 

A Horseback and Camping Trip in the Rocky Mountains of Wyoming and Yellowstone National 
Park. On the go all the time through the most beautiful, interesting and picturesque wild country 
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Young Women. 

You see Ranch Life, Horses, Cattle, Cowboys, and Irrigation in the Buffalo Bill Country. 

The Canyons, Mountains, Rivers, Lakes, Waterfalls, Geysers, Boiling-Springs, Lava Beds, Petri- 
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The Big Game of the Rockies — Bear, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Buffaloes, Wolves, Coyotes, Moose, 
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And the Big Wild West Stampede at Cody, Wyoming. 

Chaperoned by a group of select women from the faculties of Eastern Colleges and Girls' Schools. 

For Booklet Address: 

JULIAN S. BRYAN or YOLANDA ALLEN 

459 Siwanoy Place 316 Claflin Hall 

Pelham Manor, New York Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. 

Wellesley women may make reservation through Miss Allen. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



EDITOR IN CHIEF 

ELIZABETH M. WOODY, 1922 

Associate Editors 

BEATRICE JEFFERSON, 1922 

DOROTHY M. WILLIAMS, 1922 

Assistant Editors 

DOROTHEA COMLY, 1922 

MARGARET WATTERSON, 1922 
ELIZABETH ALLEN, 1923 

ELIZABETH SANFORD, 1923 

HELEN STAHL, 1923 

LOUISE CHILD. 1924 

BARBARA CONGER, 1924 
RUTH HELLER, 1924 
MARY FRASER, 1923 

DOROTHY MERZ, 1923 

CHARLOTTE MORRIS, 1925 

EVELYN ROAT, 1925 
ELIZABETH BUETHE, 1924 



BUSINESS STAFF 
Business Manager 

SUSAN GRAFFAM, 1922 

Circulation Manager 
BARBARA BATES. 1922 

Assistant Circulation Manager 

MARGARET INGRAHAM, 1923 

Advertising Manager 
RUTH WHITE, 1923 

Assistant Managers 

MAY FALES, 1924 
ANNETTE WRIGHT, 1924 



Published weekly during the college year by a board of students of Wellesley Col- 
lege. Subscriptions, one dollar and seventy-five cents per annum in advance. Single 
copies, six cents each. All contributions should be in the News office by 9.00 P. M. on 
Sunday at the latest and should be addressed to Elizabeth Woody. All Alumnae news 
should be sent to Laura "Dwight, Wellesley College, Wellesley, Mass. All business 
communications and subscriptions should be sent to the Wellesley College News, 
Wellesley, Mass. 

Entered as second-class matter, October 10, 1919, at the Post Office at Wellesley 
Branch, Boston, Mass., under the Act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in section 1103, Act of October 3, 1917, authorized 
October 30, 1919. 



THE CHAPEL DILEMMA 



Of late there has been much discus- 
sion as to whether Wellesley shall or 
shall not have compulsory morning 
chapel. The present system, of hav- 
ing chapel service purely voluntary, 
has resulted in so slight an attend- 
ance as to seem to argue a lack of 
desire on the part of the student body 
for week-day services. If it is true 
that the college at large does not want 
morning chapel and sees no interest 
in it, the administration may decide to 
omit it altogether. But we feel that 
the vast majority of students would 
view with disfavor any plan to discon- 
tinue morning services. Even those 
who haven't the energy or inclination 
to get down to the chapel at 8:15 each 
morning, believe in having daily serv- 
ices for the sake of those who care to 
attend. It is manifestly unfair, how- 
ever, to ask the administration to con- 
tinue these services unless they are 
supported by the student body. Un- 
less attendance improves or services 
are discontinued altogether, the only 
alternative is to make chapel com- 
pulsory. 

The strongest argument in favor of 
compulsory chapel seems to be that 
the college needs some means of get- 
ting together, of thinking and acting 
as a unit, and that a chapel service 
attended by the entire student body 
would satisfy this need. Any attempt 
to create a feeling of solidarity 
throughout the college is laudable, 
but there is no assurance that a rule 
compelling undergraduates to assem- 
ble together would be effective. No 
spontaneous esprit de corps can be 
generated by compulsion, nor is the 
present type of chapel service wholly 
adequate. The expedient might be 
tried of making chapel less formal and 
more inspiring than it is at present, 
with the hope that more students 
would then attend of their own ac- 
cord. If brief talks on questions con- 
cerning college life or on subjects of 
interest and importance to such a 
community as this were substituted 
for the reading of the lesson and 
Psalms the morning services might be- 
come more representative of college 



and make a stronger appeal to stu- 
dents. Also it is quite possible that a 
change in the time of service would 
result in larger attendance. The bene- 
fit derived from starting the day out 
with a chapel service is perhaps less 
than the advantage of having more 
people at a later service. If chapel 
were held in the late afternoon it 
could be half instead of a quarter of 
an hour long. Many of these sugges- 
tions may prove unfeasible upon in- 
vestigation, but it might be well to try 
some such expedients before making 
chapel attendance compulsory. 



Free Press Column 



All contributions for this column must be 
signed with the full name of the author. 
Only articles thus signed will be printed. 
Initials or numerals will be used in printing 
the articles if the writer so desires. 

The Editors do not hold themselves re- 
sponsible for opinions and statements which 
appear in this column. 

Contributions should be In the hands of 
the Editors by 9 P. M. on Sunday. 

Contributions must be as brief as possible. 



COMPULSORY CHAPEL 



To the Wellesley College News: 

Chapel exercises as they are at- 
tended at present do not begin to ful- 
fill their function in the life of the 
college. It is self-evident that we can- 
not leave attendance a voluntary mat- 
ter any longer. Two alternatives are 
open to us: We can eliminate morn- 
ing chapel altogether or we can make 
it compulsory. To eliminate the serv- 
ices altogether would be a step back- 
ward, for in our attempt to conform 
to the purposes and ideals of the 
founders of the college we cannot al- 
together disregard morning chapel. 

After all, it is not such a punish- 
ment to attend chapel. It merely 
means beginning one's day at 8:15 in- 
stead of at 8:40. If anyone had re- 
ligious scruples against the service 
itself, it is to be presumed that she 
would not be forced to attend. But 
the conscientious objectors are few 
in number. Most of us are just lazy. 
We belong to the class which says, 
"I'd like to go to chapel, but I just 
don't get there." If classes were 



made entirely voluntary a lot of us 
would have the same feeble excuse. 
But if we were under some obliga- 
tion to attend chapel, we would get 
in the habit before very long. And no 
one can deny that it is a habit worth 
having. 

It seems a pity to give up chapel 
altogether but at the rate at which 
matters are going now we will be 
forced to before very long, unless we 
make attendance compulsory. 1923. 



A PKOTEST 



To the Wellesley College News: 

The author of "A Sacrifice for No 
Gain," which appeared in your Free 
Press Column on February 9, has 
been accused of abysmal stupidity. 
She wishes to protest! 

The author is fully aware of how the 
present limitation was put upon so- 
cieties, and of why it was done. That 
was two years ago, and the plan was 
tentative. The societies agreed to it 
upon this basis, for they felt that the 
Barn needed everything to give it 
a splendid start. If, in the course of 
two years, the societies felt they were 
suffering too much they were sure the 
Barn, now safely established and be- 
ginning a new tradition of its own, 
would consider their needs. 

The societies have suffered. Be- 
cause their work could be made 
known to so few people, those who 
know nothing of it say they do no 
work at all. Because so few fresh- 
men and sophomores know anything 
of it, the tendency grows not to take 
work into consideration when they 
sign for societies. The freshmen and 
sophomores must have more chance to 
become acquainted through the open 
events. When such a small number 
of students can see the event, and it 
is an invitation affair it becomes an 
exclusive gathering, approaching a 
rushing party. But above all, that to 
witness such well-spent effort as goes 
into society dramatic events should 
be made the privilege of a fortunate 
few, seems totally out of keeping with 
the Wellesley ideal of fairness and 
democracy. 

The author of "Barn or Societies" 
(which seems a misleading title, since 
the societies have no desire to dis- 
place the Barn, whatever may be the 
Barn's intention), states that more 
time would be needed to prepare for 
five or six hundred guests. The so- 
cieties do not ask for more time. They 
feel their productions at present could 
be witnessed with pleasure by twice 
that number. Moreover, if the larger 
an audience, the more important the 
event, the Barn is still far enough in 
the lead to draw all the talent to it- 
self. Isn't the real difference in the 
coach, anyway? A girl with dramatic 
talent will rush to be in the event 
where she can have experienced 
coaching, and develop her powers. 

If the Academic Council would con- 
sider a society event with six hundred 
guests "major," it must consider a 
Barn Pliscoda so too. 

The case of the societies is a hard 
one. They are bitterly attacked for 
failure to justify their existence by 
work. When they beg to be allowed 




"S" 

A new and startling use of the for- 
merly commonplace letter " S " has 
very recently been discovered. The 
name of its progenitor has been lost, 
making any reward for his service im- 
possible. 

It has been observed that this pe- 
culiar usage of " S " is most prevalent 
among that class of people, commonly 
known as " Flappers." However, be 
that as it may, the discovery is a re- 
markable one, as will be noticed by a 
careful perusal of the following: 

" S' your family? " 

"S' fine. S' yours?" 

" S' well. S' om I." 

" S' the next dance? " 

"S' Saturday." 

" S' isn't. S' Friday." 

" S' great." 

" S' new car of Henry's." 

" S' one of his father's." 

" S* his." 

" S' not. See that bird?" 

" S' n owl." 

"S' not." 

" S' n eagle." 

" S' n either. S' n ostrich." 
■ " S' tis." 

" S' time to go." 

" S' long." 

"S' long." 

r 

The College Child's Alphabet 



(Being definitions of a certain system 
of marking) 
A is for Anyone, 
Tiny or great, 
Who studies her lessons 
Till hours are late. 

B is for Brainy — 
People who work 
"With conscience and will" 
And can't ever shirk. 

C is for Credit 
Sweet word to one's ears, 
Which means she is safe 
Till another mid-years. 

D is for Doubtful, 
The status of some, 
Which often implies 
That its owner is dumb. 

E is for Edict,— 
"She shall not pass!" 
Often it means that 
She drops from her class. 

F is for Failure 

Which all people hate, 

Saying in sorrow, 

"Too late! Ah, too late! " 

Happy indeed is the dear "college 

child," 
That farther than this, her grades 

aren't compiled! 



to meet this criticism by direct proof, 

they are denied the opportunity. 1922* 

(Continued on Page 6, Col. 1.) 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 




What Is Water Japan? 

IAPAN — not the country but a metal-coating varnish — 
*■* and your morning bottle of milk. Totally unlike, yet 
associated! 

Ordinary japan consists of a tough, rubbery, tar-like "base" 
and a highly inflammable "solvent." The solvent dilutes 
the base so that the metal may be coated with it easily. The 
presence of the solvent involves considerable fire risk, espe- 
cially in the baking oven. 

Milk is a watery fluid containing suspended particles of 
butter fat, so small that one needs the ultra-microscope to de- 
tect them. An insoluble substance held permanently in sus- 
pension in a liquid in this manner is in "colloidal suspension." 

The principle of colloidal suspension as demonstrated in 
milk was applied by the Research Laboratories of the General 
Electric Company to develop Water Japan. In this com- 
pound the particles of japan base are colloidally suspended 
in water. The fire risk vanishes. 

So the analysis of milk has pointed the way to a safe 
japan. Again Nature serves industry. 

Connected with the common things around us are many 
principles which may be applied to the uses of industry with 
revolutionary results. As Hamlet said, "There are more 
things in Heaven and earth, Horatio, than are dreamt of in 
your philosophy." 




General Office 



Schenectady, N. Y. 
95-479HD 



HOUSE DISCUSSES CHAPEL 
ATTENDANCE 



(Continued from Page 1) 



gether, to feel a sense of unity now 
felt only on rare occasions. In answer 
to this, it was argued that to make 
chapel compulsory would be to adopt 
a backward principle in religion, and 
one to which the conscientious objector 
might well object. A p:an was also 
suggested whereby chapel could be 
made more interesting, through out- 



side speakers or talks on current 
subjects, and thus have a more univer- 
sal appeal. 

Further discussion was postponed 
until house meetings in the dormi- 
tories should give the college at large 
opportunities to discuss the question. 

House Suggests Knirker Regulations 

The House voted that the result of 
the discussion concerning the wearing 
of knickers be posted in the houses 
as a suggestion. The consensus of 
opinion was that, on the campus, 



knickers should be worn with coats, 
and only for sports. 

A petition requesting that students 
be allowed to return after vacations in 
time for their first class, and not at a 
set time, is to be sent from the House 
to the Academic Council for consid- 
eration. The committee bureau sys- 
tem was voted abolished, after reports 
from the head of Christian Associa- 
tion and the vice-president of the 
Barnswallows, and the question of vil- 
lage seniors was laid on the table in- 
definitely. 



WORLD NEWS 



Resigns From Bench 

Feb. 19. Judge Landis has resigned 
from the Federal bench in order to de- 
vote more time to the American Le- 
gion and to organized baseball, of 
which he is now the supreme dictator. 

Army Dirigible Burns 

Feb. 21. The army dirigible, Roma, 
built by Italy for the United States, 
crashed to the earth near Hampton 
Roads in Virginia, hitting high ten- 
sion wires which ignited the hydro- 
gen. It is believed that faulty control 
of the rudder was the original cause 
of the wreck which resulted in the 
death of 34 passengers. Only 11 es- 
caped from the burning airship. 

New London Hygiene School 

Feb. 22. The Minister of Health of 
the British Government announces a 
gift of £2,000,000 from the Rockefel- 
ler Foundation toward the cost of 
building and equipping a school of 
hygiene in London. A provision is at- 
tached which binds the British Gov- 
ernment to the maintenance of staff 
and school. 

Sliaw Declines Political Offer 

Feb. 23. George Bernard Shaw has 
declined the invitation of the Labor 
Party of West Edinburgh to become a 
candidate for the British Parliament. 
He stated that he preferred not to nar- 
row his audience "from civilized man- 
kind to a handful of bewildered com- 
mercial gentlemen." 

Reduction in England's Army 

Feb. 23. England is reducing her 
army by the discharge of 33,000 offi- 
cers and men — involving the demobi- 
lization of 24 battalions of infantry, 47 
batteries of artillery, and 5 cavalry 
regiments. The saving of expenditure 
is estimated at £15,500,000. 

Industrial Alliance 

Feb. 22. An agreement was adopted 
unanimously by the representatives of 
more than 2,000,000 workers in coal 
mines, railroad employees, and long- 
shoremen at a meeting in Chicago. The 
declaration called for "closer cooper- 
ation of our forces which now operate 
to protect more effectively the union 
workers in wage struggles." This, 
however, does not bind the railroad 
men or longshoremen to a sympathetic 
strike on April 1, the date set for the 
miners' walk-out. 

Twenty-Tear Anglo-French Alliance 

Feb. 26. Poincare and Lloyd George 
have announced that the Anglo- 
French Treaty of alliance is to be 
signed in London before the opening 
of economic negotiations at Genoa on 
April 10. The treaty, extending for 
twenty years, pledges England to 
come to immediate aid of France in 
ease of unprovoked at lack by Ger- 
many and to support France in en- 
forcing German disarmament. The 
alliance also calls for joint action in 
case of trouble on Germany's eastern 
frontier. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



FREE PRESS, 



(Continued from Page 4, Col. 4.) 



THINK! THEN ACT! 



To the Wellesley College News: 

Do you want the new Barn plan and 
the kind of dramatics it has given 
you? Before deciding this question 
which is vital to every one of you, you 
should weigh the facts, for they alone 
uphold or condemn the present Barn 
plan. 

In March, 1920, when the new plan 
for dramatics was proposed, it was 
stated that the first aim was to achieve 
better dramatics. All right. Now, has 
the Barn in its two year trial period 
given better dramatic productions? 
Many who have attended Barn plays 
both under the old and new plan feel 
as I do, that the new plan has not 
done what it proposed to do and there- 
fore should not be accepted in its 
present form by the college. 

In the first place the Barn chose to 
give the Tragedy of Nan. Society 
Zeta Alpha had already given that 
play, and as the March 11, 1920 NEWS 
states, "Its presentation marked an- 
other able and artistic, dramatic pro- 
duction." But the Barn ignored that 
fact, and decided to give the play as 
one of its major dramatic events of 
the year. Moreover it took the princi- 
pal character, Rebecca Hill, and then 
having given the play made brilliant 
by her acting, sat back on its laurels 
and said, "That's what the new Barn 
plan brings about." 

Then Operetta was given and highly 
praised (and rightly so) but its suc- 
cess can hardly be said to be an argu- 



ment for the new Barn plan. Operetta 
always has been an all-college event, 
composed and managed by the student 
body. 

And then came Drake, that glitter- 
ing pageant of last June's commence- 
ment, that was only an able handling 
of masses. Certainly it was not a 
well chosen performance for a com- 
mencement program, since Tree Day 
and Float Night, both commencement 
features are pageant in character. 

Finally the Barn gave Moliere's 
play The Learned Ladies. A NEWS 
article rated it highly but never once 
mentioned the fact that the men's 
voices were hopelessly feminine, and 
that at the Saturday evening perform- 
ance the play practically fell through. 
Hesitation and repetition of syllables 
were frequent, and once the dialogue 
came to a complete standstill. Now 
that can not be called a finished pro- 
duction no matter by whom or under 
whose auspices the play was given. 

Such have been the dramatics under 
the new Barn plan. Listen now to at 
least a few of the many facts and crit- 
icisms of plays under the old plan and 
ask yourself if you think your drama- 
tics as good. 

To go back far enough to give a good 
perspective, let us take 1913's senior 
play Tristram and Iseult, a play 
worthy of production by any good 
dramatic organization. A NEWS oi 
that date says it was a play of singu- 
larly beautiful artistic effects as well 
as successful acting. Again, in 1914 
Alpha Kappa Chi presented Medea and 
the July NEWS says, "No higher trib- 
ute can be paid to the success of 
Medea than that the interest and at- 



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tention of the audience was held from 
beginning to end." Alpha Kappa Chi 
presented to us in a finished manner 
one of those great classics. Then in 
1915 The Piper was given, and Mrs. 
Josephine Preston Peabody Marks 
thought so highly of it that she wrote 
the following to Miss Smaill, "I am 
full of appreciation for the brilliant 
results of all your work, for vivid and 
sympathetic intelligence of rendering 
and for generous imagination toward 
the spirit of the play. I have had no 
such satisfaction from any profession- 
al skill so far." Such were the criti- 
cisms of the earlier plays. Can you 
honestly say anything half so good for 
the plays produced under the new 
Barn plan of the last two years? I 
for one say, "No." 

And now to turn to the later plays. 
In 1919, the juniors gave The Man 
Who Married a Dumb Wife and Three 
Pills in a Bottle, a 47 Workshop play. 
Of the first the NEWS says, "The play 
on the whole was an excellent produc- 
tion, the results of a careful, pains- 
taking work and one that 1921 may 
well be proud of." Of the second play 
it says, "It is one that has not been 
equalled in the' memory of the college 
generation except in 1919's presenta- 
tion of The Chinese Lantern. 

All these illustrations have taken 
a good deal of space but they are nec- 
essary to give the college members a 
sufficient background of plays with 
which to compare our present produc- 
tions. I feel as do many, many people 
that the new Barn plan not only has 
failed to give plays equal to plays 
given in the past, but has fallen below 
the standards of the past. So why 
support the Barn plan whose aim was 
to achieve better college dramatics 
when it has shown itself unable to 
do so? 

Now this is not being written with 
the idea of putting societies first, or 
from a society standpoint, but from 
the standpoint of an alumna who does 
not desire to lose the beauty and 
worth of plays given in the past, 
and who feels that under the plan of 
the last two years the Barn has not 
achieved better dramatics. 

Now, since the Barn in the ample 
time that it has had to show its possi- 
bilities has not given the college better 
dramatics, do you intend to vote for 
the plan when it comes up for atten- 
tion? The proponents of the plan will 
urge you to. Freshmen, sophomores 
and juniors hearken to the facts and 
criticisms given by many alumnae, 
and think over carefully the plays you 
have seen and ask yourself if you 
think them excellent. 

By way of constructive suggestion, 
let the Barn give Operetta, the June 
play and even the junior play, three 
of the major events, but let the 
dramatics of the past live and thrive 
as those of the past have. Undergrad- 
uates, do not vote for the plan as it 
stands. Think, considering the values 
of past plays, and propose the plan 
whereby the Barn can both give per- 
formances that could satisfy its high- 
's' alms, and yet save and appreciate 
the dramatics, given by societies, 
which are held in high esteem by 
older alumnae and recent graduates. 
An Alumna. 



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NATIONALISM A MADNESS, 
SAYS LECTURER 



Deplores Present Tendencies in 
Europe 



"The history of the nineteenth cen- 
tury had one great tendency," said 
Professor Josef Redlich in his lecture 
on present day conditions in the form- 
er Austrian Empire, given in Billings 
Hall on Monday evening, February 27.' 
' "That was the consolidation of the 
great European continent into large 
empires which were centers of cul- 
ture, trade, and commerce, — the uni- 
fying agents of modern civilization." 

The war, continued Mr. Redlich, de- 
stroyed the three oldest empires; the 
Russian, the Ottoman, and the rem- 
nants of the Holy Roman Empire of 
Germanic peoples which existed in 
what was known as the Austro-Hun- 
garian Empire. This tendency, how- 
ever, roused the spirit of nationalism 
which has for its war cry the self- 
determination of small and large ra- 
cial groups. The war, which pro- 
duced the greatest changes which 
have happened in Europe in the last 
five hundred years, ended in at at- 
tempt to break up these large entities 
into small self-governing states. By 
cutting up the old units, said Mr. Red- 
lich, the main arteries of culture and 
civilization in Europe have been sev- 
ered, and consequently a continuous 
process of growing poverty and eco- 
nomic weakness is going on. The 
only solution for this "nationalistic 
madness" is, according to Mr. Red- 
lich, a "code of toleration enforced 
by the full power of progressive na- 
tions and in large measure by the 
education of the people, through an 
international association which has 
roots in every corner of Europe." 



ENGAGED 



Ex-'21 Aline D. Long to Harold's. 
Stern, of Lockport, N. Y. 

'22 Dorothea B. Comly to Carroll 
S. Harvey of Wellesley Hills. 

'22 Jean Ashton to Robert Moseley 
Eldred, of Springfield, Mass. 

'25 J. Kay Finnemore to Thomas 
Cabot Sherwood, Harvard, '22. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETIES HOLD PROGRAM 
MEETING 



(Continued from Page Two) 



Dancing Boy. .. .Blanche Schlivek, '23 

Chorus of Women 

Ruth Marsh, '23; Emily Nichols, '22; 
Elizabeth King, '23; Elizabeth Gar- 
diner, '22; Use Gehring, '22. 

The Argument 

Euripides, on account of his hatred 
of women displayed in his tragedies, 
is accused and condemned in the 
Thesmophoria, a festival to which only 
women were admitted. After a vain 
attempt to persuade the poet Agathon 
to assume the risk, Euripedes pre- 
vails upon his father-in-law, Mnesilo- 
chus, to enter the Thesmophoria in 
disguise. Mnesilochus is discovered 
to be a man. Euripedes appears in 
the guise of characters in his plays to 
try to save Mnesilochus by a ruse. At 
length, by a dancing girl and boy, the 
policeman is enticed away. These 
parodied scenes are almost entirely in 
the words of the tragedies of Euri- 
pedes. 

Phi Sigma 

Phi Sigma took up folk lore in a 
general way at its program meeting, 
the first of the year relating to this, 
its chosen subject of study. The 
meeting was conducted informally, 
those with special topics speaking 
from their seats. The following sub- 
jects were considered: "What Folk 
Lore Is," "History and Growth of Folk 
Lore," "Forms of Folk Lore," "Folk 
Stories," "Folk Dancing," and "Folk 
Songs." 

Tan Zeta Epsilon 

Tau Zeta Epsilon took the British 
School of Painting as the subject of 
its program meeting. The program 
was as follows: 

1. Paper on British Artists and 
Music, Elizabeth Ehrhart, '23. 

2. Pictures. 

A. Lachrymae: Lord Leigh ton. 

Metropolitan Museum of Art, 

New York. 
Model — Ruth Williamson, '22. 



Critic — Dorothy Grover, '22. 
Sub-critic — Josephine Barbour, 

'22. 
B. Portrait of a Boy: John Opie. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
Model — Dorothy Wilson, '23. 
Critic — Dorothy Stevens, '22. 
Sub-critic — Bernice Anderson, 

'23. 

3. Music. 

Dorothy Tower, '22; Louisa Shot- 
well, '23. 

4. Pictures. 

A. Georgiana Elliot: Sir Joshua 

Reynolds. 
Metropolitan Museum of Art. 
Model— Ruth White, '23. 
Critic — Adelaide Milne, '22. 
Sub-critic — Constance Fritz, '23. 

B. Danae: Burne-Jones. 
Glasgow Corporation Art Gal- 
lery. 

Model — Sarah Conant, '22. 
Critic — Lois Gibboney, '22. 
Sub-critic — Louise Watklns, '23. 

Shakespeare 

At Shakespeare there were two 
papers read, one on "Shakespeare 
News," by Winifred Van Horsen, '23, 
and the other an introduction to the 
study of Cymbeline, by Margaret Car- 
ter, '22. In addition, four scenes were 
presented from Cymbeline, which the 
society is considering for its semi- 
open meeting this spring. 

Cast 

Imogen Mildred Durant, '22 

Cloten Irene Ott, '23 

First Lord Elizabeth Gay, '23 

Second Lord Margaret Wylie, '22 

Lady Mary Hackney, '23 

lachamo Adele Eichler, '22 

Posthumus Juliet Iglehart, '23 

Philario Frances Sturgis, '22 

Arviragus Laura Sherrard, '23 

Guizerius Helen Scudder, '23 

Belarius Elizabeth Wilcox, '22 

Zeta Alpha 

Zeta Alpha presented the last act 
of Deirdre of the Sorrows, by Synge, 
a tragedy which will be given com- 
plete at its semi-open meeting on 
March 10. Preceding the play a paper 



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was read by Jane Harvey, '23, on the 
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CAST 

Deirdre Madeline Block, '23 

Naisi Hope Parker, '23 

King Conchubor Janet Ward, '22 

Fergus Grace Graham, '22 

Two Old Women 

Charlotte Hilton, '22; Mary Stahl, '22 

Two Soldiers 

....Ruth Lindall, Harriet Holcombe 



NEWS FROM OTHER COLLEGES. 



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TO-DAY! 



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The Brown Jug is to issue a Girls' 
Number in April. Contributions, ar- 
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are due on March 15, and should be 
sent to the managing editor, The 
Brown Jug, Brown University, Provi- 
dence, R. I. One hundred dollars in 
prizes will be awarded. Upon request, 
a free copy will be sent for inspection. 



New Selective Plan at Dartmouth 

High scholarship, character, leader- 
ship qualities, and the principles of 
geographical, professional and occu- 
pational distribution are the primary 
factors in a new selective process Dy 
which Dartmouth College will choose 
the class of 1926. This has been made 
necessary by the overwhelming num- 
ber of applicants and the fact that 
only a comparatively small group can 
be admitted to the college next Sep- 
tember. 

Honor System Suspended 

The honor system under which stu- 
dents of the Wharton School of 
Finance at the University of Pennsyl- 
vania have been accustomed to taking 
all examinations, was suspended by 
special faculty action on February 13. 
Reports of repeated violations, com- 
bined with the reticence of the Whar- 
ton men to report violators to the 
Honor Committee, was assigned as the 
reason for the suspension of the tra- 
ditional code. — Ex. 




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ICE HOCKEY NEW SPORT AT 
WELLESLEY 



EMILY GORDON WILL PRESIDE 
AT Y. W. C. A. CONVENTION 



National Student Assembly To Dc 
Organized 



For the first time in the history of 
the student movement of the Young 
Women's Christian Association, a na- 
tional student assembly will be organ- 
ized at the seventh national conven- 
tion of the Young Women's Christian 
Association, which will take place at 



Hot Springs, Ark., April 20 to 21. 
More than 200 student delegates from 
the leading colleges and universities 
of the country will attend as delegates 
and participate in the election of a 
national student president. 

Emily Gordon, a member of 
the student body at Wellesley College, 
who has been serving as the national 
chairman of the field councils of the 
student Y. W. C. A. movement, will pre- 
side at the meeting at Hot Springs, 
until the election of a president. Miss 
Welch has called a meeting of the 



student executive committee for March 
4, at the National Headquarters of 
the Young Women's Christian Asso- 
ciation, 600 Lexington Avenue, New 
York City, at which time the commit- 
tee chairmen for the student assembly 
at Hot Springs will be appointed. 

This will be the second time in the 
history of the Y. W. C. A. that the 
student and industrial groups have 
come together to discuss their prob- 
lems, the first occasion being at a 
conference in New York City more 
than a -year ago. 



Practice to Continue While Ice Lasts 



In spite of the discouragement of- 
fered by the weather, there has been 
great enthusiasm for ice hockey this 
winter. Helen Sherman, '21, has been 
coaching the teams on Monday and 
Thursday afternoons whenever there 
was ice, and practice will continue as 
long as the weather remains cold 
enough. It has been found inadvisable 
to have a team for each class. In- 
stead, there are two teams only, one 
for the odd, one for the even classes. 

Plans for a winter carnival include 
a hockey game, even though the teams 
lack finish, because of the short time 
during which they have practiced. 
However, at whatever date the carni- 
val is finally held, an ice hockey game 
will form part of the program. 

For this new sport at Wellesley 
goals and sticks have already been ac- 
quired. A gift of five fine Canadian 
sticks has been received by the Outing 
Club. 

If conditions for hockey continue to 
be adverse this year, the idea will be 
taken up next year, when it is hoped 
that greater progress will be made. 



PLANS FOR CARNIVAL 
HELD OPEN 



WH1 Be Held on Short Notice 
If Snow Falls 



Hope for a winter carnival at Wel- 
lesley this year has almost evaporated, 
because of the frequent postponements 
necessitated by adverse weather con- 
ditions. It has been put off indefinite- 
ly now, until sufficient snow falls. If 
there is another appreciable snow 
storm this winter the carnival will be 
held on very short notice, possibly in 
the middle of the week, instead of on 
Saturday, as it is usually planned. 

The program for the carnival which 
was scheduled for Washington's Birth- 
day was to include skiing, a snowshoe 
dash, a toboggan relay race between 
classes, a snowshoe obstacle race, and 
ice sports; a hockey game between the 
odd and even classes, a dash on 
skates, and possibly some fancy skat- 
ing. Winners of the different events 
were to have been presented with 
Outing Club pins, and points were to 
accrue to the different classes. As 
trophies, two cups have been bought, 
one to be presented to the class, and 
one to the individual having the high- 
est score at the end of the afternoon. 

Betty Parsons, '22, chairman of the 
carnival, has kept in touch with the 
weather man, who offers no promise of 
snow. However, plans are being held 
over in the possibility of a sufficient 
fall to warrant a carnival. Prospective 
contestants are meanwhile practicing 
as much as possible. 

The Outing Club will offer spring 
hikes and a water carnival later on, 
to offset the disappointment in winter 
activities. 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CONTEMPORARY REALISM TO BE 
PHILOSOPHER'S SUBJECT 



Or. Bright man Will Speak March 11 



Dr. Edgar S. Brightman will lecture 
upon "Contemporary Realism" on Sat- 
urday, March 11, at 10:40 A.M., in 
Room 222 Founders' Hall. Dr. Bright- 
man has recently been appointed pro- 
fessor of philosophy in Boston Univer- 
sity, and is a close thinker and vig- 
orous speaker. The Department of 
Philosophy and Psychology extends a 
general invitation for this event to the 
college. 



DEPARTMENT STORES OFFER 

VARIETY OF POSITIONS 



Opportunity to Work Up 



"A department store is not the 
place for those looking for a soft 
snap: everyone must be alive every 
minute." Mr. J. H. Fairclough of the 
Personnel Department of Jordan 
Marsh Co. thus described the sort of 
position open to college girls in de- 
partment stores, in his talk on Mon- 
day, February 27. Employees of a 
large department store usually start 
at the bottom as sales girls, and ad- 
vance by a system of promotion. A 
department store covers almost all 
lines of work, and the right kind of 
person can advance rapidly to a re- 
sponsible position. 



STONE TO HOLD FAIR FOR FUND 



Will Take Place On St. Patrick's Day 



Articles of every description will 
be donated by Stone residents to be 
sold at the fair planned by that dormi- 
tory for St. Patrick's Day. The pro- 
ceeds of the sale will go to the fund, 
and it is expected that many attractive 
and original features will help in 
realizing good profits. 

LOST 

At the Barn, Saturday evening, 
February 4, a pair of gray kid gloves, 
wool lined. Will the finder please re- 
turn them to Miss Helen A. Merrill, 
Claflin Hall? 



SPEAKERS PRESENT NEGRO 

EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS 



(Continued From Page One) 



vicious tendencies. There are nowa- 
days in Mr. Walker's home county 
negro high schools and prosperous 
homes. But last year the state of Vir- 
ginia as a whole contained 95,000 
negro children who did not go to 
school even one day of the year. 
There is much for Hampton to do, Mr. 
Walker pointed out. He himself was 
adopted by a Boston philanthropist, 
who paid his tuition as a student, 
never having seen him. At present 
Mr. Walker's daughter is going 
through the school on a scholarship 
fund raised by a northern group — 
perhaps a Welle'sley contribution. 
Negroes in the south, said Mr. Walker, 
are very grateful to the north for cre- 
ating sentiment as well as opportuni- 
ties for negro education. 

Dr. Gregg Explains Race Differences 

Dr. Gregg, whose speech followed a 
selection from the quartet, said that 
the negro music was like the race it- 
self: simple, sincere, and full of a 
mystic faith. He touched upon the 
prevalent difficulties between the 
races; lynchings and vote-buying are 
not confined~to the south, he remarked. 
Speaking of the negro as our national 
responsibility, Dr. Gregg reminded his 
hearers that the negroes came to 
America not because they wished to 
but because they were forced to. It is 
therefore our duty to see that they 
shall have their chance along with the 
rest. Hampton Institute does its best 
to give them that chance. It trains 
them in hard, steady work, and aims 
to develop self respect, trustworthi- 
ness, and unselfishness. Dr. Gregg ex- 
pressed a hope that Wellesley would 
send some more teachers to Hampton; 
several have already proved their 
value there. 

Quartet's Singing Enjoyed 

The music of the quartet was, of 
course, enjoyed to the fullest extent. 
Plantation songs and negro spirituals 
were rendered with genuine Dixie fer- 
vor. The unison and the quality of the 




j^W^yia^it 



INC. 



chhmen asid^Hcci&ea 
2B4 BOYLSTON STREET 

OPPOSITE BOSTON PUBLIC GARDENS 

BOSTON 




voices, together with the ease and llox- 
ibility of range, carried the audience 
along on the swell of persuasive 
rhythms such as those found in "Lil 
David, Play on Yo' Harp," "Walkin' in 
de Light," "One Mo' Ribber to Cross," 
and the incredibly beautiful "Swing 
Low, Sweet Chariot." 



FELLOWSHIPS OFFEREO IN 

SOCIAL ECONOMIC RESEARCH 



(Continued from Page 1) 



in the construction and interpretation 
of statistical tables, and in the literary 
presentation of the results of the in- 
vestigation. All fellows are required 
to take the course in statistics given 
by the Director of the Department of 
Research. 

In addition to formal training in 
statistics and methods of research, two 
cooperative investigations will be 
made by the staff of the Research De- 
partment. The first of these is lim- 
ited in scope and may be based on 
data already collected. The second, 
which will be the chief original inves- 
tigation of the year, will require field 
work for the filling of schedules, and 
will afford each fellow experience in all 
stages of the work required for mod- 
ern cooperative investigations of so- 
cial or economic problems. 

Affiliations with Colleges 

Students who have received satis- 
factory undergraduate training in so- 
ciology and economics may offer the 
year's work in the Research Depart- 
ment in fulfillment of requirements for 
the degree of Master of Science in Re- 
search at Simmons College. The thesis 
or research work is accepted also in 
certain seminar courses at Radcliffe 
College, Tufts College, and Massachu- 
setts Institute of Technology. By spe- 
cial arrangement with the Committee 
on Graduate Instruction of Wellesley 
College, the work may be counted as 
a part of the requirements for a mas- 
ter's degree. Several western univer- 
sities have accepted the completed 
studies as theses for advanced degrees, 
and have given graduate credit for 
the training in research. Professors 
from affiliated colleges serve on the 
committee which awards the fellow- 
ships. 

Applications 

Application must be filed before May 
1st. 

For application blanks and answers 
to inquiries, address Department of 
Research, Women's Educational and 
Industrial Union, 2G4 Boylston street, 
Boston 17, Massachusetts. 



The Theatre 



Colonial — Fred Stone in Tip Top. 
Hollis — Billie Burke in The Intimate 

Strangers. 
Plymouth — George Arliss in The 

Green Goddess. 
Selwyn — John Drew and Mrs. Lesliu 

Carter in The Circle. 
Shubert — Mclntyre and Heath in Red 

Pepper. 
Wilbur — Joseph Schildkraut and Eva 

Le Gallienne in Liliom. 




" I have written a letter 
of recommendation for 
you, Celeste." 

"Thank you, madam. If 
the letter speaks as well 
for me as the letter paper 
does for you, I shall 
secure a position most 
easily." 



ft 



line: 



Reflects the good taste, 
of everybody who uses 
it, in no uncertain terms. 
In texture, sizes and en- 
velope shapes it conforms 
to the standard set by 
social usage. It's a 
paper of quality, yet 
inexpensive. 

AT ALL GOOD STATIONERS 

Eaton Crane and Pike Co. 

NEW YORK 
PITTSFIELD, MASS. 



LIST OF APPROVED 

HOUSES POSTED 



(Continued from Page 2, Col. 3) 



WAYLAND, MASS. 
"Wayland Inn" — Miss E. Wells. 

WINTHROP HIGHLANDS, MASS. 
"Cliff House"— Mr. Fred Bochterle, $ 
per day. 



'■22 ANNOUNCES TREE DAY 



Mistress and Aides 



Olive Ladd will be senior, and Ruth 
Libbey, freshman. Tree Day Mistress. 
The aides to the senior Mistress are: 
Caroline Ingham, Elizabeth Woody, 
Dorothy Tower, and Harriet Rathbun. 
The freshman Receiver-of-the-Spade 
is Kathryn Shea. '24 also announces 
the election of Jane Peck as vice- 
president, to succeed Frances King- 
horn. 



10 



THE WELLESLEY COLLEGE NEWS 



CALENDAR 



Thursday, March 2—8:30-11:30 A.M. 
12:30-4:00 P.M., Concert course office 
hours for distribution of tickets, room 
C, Billings Hall. 8:00 P.M., Houghton 
Memorial Chapel, Organ recital by 
Mr. Henry R. Austin, some time or- 
ganist and choir director at the Eng- 
lish Royal Church of St. George, 
Berlin. 

Friday, March 3 — Office hours as 
noted above for the concert course. 
4:40 P.M., 124 Founders Hall, Profes- 
sor Anna J. McKeag will speak on 
"State Requirements and the First 
Day of Teaching." (Appt. Bureau) 
8:00 P.M., the Barn, Japanese plays. 
Mr. and Mrs. Michitaro Ongawa. (Ad- 
mission by ticket.) 

Saturday, March 1—8:30-11:30 A.M., 
Room C, Billings Hall. Final office 
hours for the concert course. 

Sunday, March 5—11 A.M. Houghton 
Memorial Chapel, Preacher Rev. Dick- 
inson S. Miller, of New York. 7:30 
P.M., Vesper service, address by Miss 
Heloise Hersey of Boston. Subject: 
"The Book by Which We Live." 

Monday, March 6—4:40 P.M., 124 
Founders, Miss Hayden, representing 
the Sleighton Farm for delinquent 
girls, will speak upon the work of 
that institution. 8:00 P.M., Houghton 
Memorial Chapel, piano recital by 
Sergei Rachmaninoff. First of two 
artist recitals under the management 
of the Department of Music. Admis- 
sion by ticket, according to poster 
announcements. 

Tuesday, March 7—4:30 P.M., Bill- 
ings Hall. Miss Mary Mac Skimmon, 
president of the Massachusetts Teach- 
ers' Association, will speak on the 
subject "Why Not Teach?" 7:45 P.M., 
Houghton Memorial Chapel, lecture by 
Mr. Shaw Desmond. Subject: Dun- 
sany, Yeats, and Shaw. 

Wednesday, March 8—7:20 P.M., 
Billings Hall. Campus meeting of C. 
A. Speaker, Mrs. Mary C. Griswold of 
the Daily Vacation Bible School. 7:20 
P.M., Washington House. Village 
Meeting of Christian Association. Ad- 
dress by Professor Gamble. Subject: 
"The Two Great Commandments." 



LLOYD'S 

Eyeglasses and Spectacles 
Kodaks and Films 

Student's Fountain Pens and Eversbarp Pencils 

ANDREW J. LLOYD CO. 

315 Washington St. 310 Boylston St. 

75 Summer St. 165 Tremont St. 

BOSTON 

other stores 
CAMBRIDGE- SALEM -BROCKTON 



Alumnae Notes 

Alumnae and former students are 
urged to co-operate in making this 
department interesting, ty sending all 
notices promptly to Alumnae Office, 
Wellesley (College) Mass. 



ENGAGED 



'19 Margaret E. Coombs to Alex- 
ander C. Pinney, Yale '19. 

'19 Katherine Leighton Hilton to 
John Hodgdon Bradley, Jr., Harvard 
'21, of Dubuque, Iowa. 

'20 Marion Fenwick Macduff to Ed- 
mund Irving Howard, M.I.T. '21. 

'21 Margaret W. Haddock to For- 
rest Bond Wing, Harvard '17. 



MARRIED 



'16 Ann Frances Matthews to 
Clement K. Stodder, February 25, at 
Dallas, Texas. At home: Hotel Can- 
terbury, Charlesgate West, Boston, 
Mass. 

'16 • Rachel E. Donovan to Charles 
S. Hall, February 21, at Pittsburgh, 
Pa. At home: 1627 Shady Avenue, 
Pittsburgh. 

'17 Alice L. Precourt to Edwin A. 
Norton, February 11, at Manchester, 
N. H. 

'19 Mary E. Long to Clarence L. 
Buzby, Feb. 25, at Lansdowne, Pa. At 
home: The Gunter, 41st St. and Balti- 
more Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

'21 Janet Victorious to Herbert 
Emmerich, University of Pennsyl- 
vania, '18, February 2. 

'21 Jessie Margaret Herring to Ar- 
thur Hooper Ware, February 14, at 
Amarillo, Texas. At home: 1610 Van 
Buren, Amarillo, Texas. 



BORN 



'12 To Helen Robertson Little, a 
daughter, February 16. 

'15 To Leora Mitchell Aultman, a 
second daughter, Judith, February 7, 
at Orange, N. J. 



DIED 



'97 Mrs. Anna M. North, mother of 
Mary North, February 19, at Ossining, 
N. Y. 

'00 Mrs. Stephen Moore, mother of 
Edith Moore Naylor, February 23, at 
Newton, Mass. 



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